Sign in to edit your profile (add interests, mentoring, photo, etc.)
    Keywords
    Last Name
    Institution

    Karl Dean Bellve PhD

    TitleResearch Assistant Professor
    InstitutionUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School
    DepartmentProgram in Molecular Medicine
    AddressUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School
    373 Plantation Street, Room 114
    Worcester MA 01605
    Phone508-856-6514
      Other Positions
      InstitutionUMMS - School of Medicine
      DepartmentMicrobiology and Physiological Systems

        Overview 
        Narrative
        Karl Bellve is a cross-discipline scientist covering the fields of Biology, Computer Science, and Electrical Engineering. He obtained his Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biology (1996, U.MD) and joined the Biomedical Imaging Group in 1997. More information about the Biomedical Imaging Group can be found from http://big.umassmed.edu.

        High-Speed 3D Epi/TIRF/Structured Light Microscopy


        His focus is on the design and implementation of computer systems and software to control  various electronics, including high-speed CCD cameras, and coordinate the high-speed electro-optical/mechanical systems, and to develop the software for specific imaging protocols necessary to gather imaging data, as well as necessary image computation and display tasks required on the control computer, and the User Interface Software that makes the system accessible. He is extremely well qualified for this role, as he designed, built and programmed the entire computer and control system for the fast TIRF/GFPM microscope system. His work has resulted in the creation of a novel high-speed fluorescence microscope system that can rapidly produce high-resolution, 3-dimensional images of fluorescence inside single cells, as well as corresponding images of near plasma membrane events at speeds of 90 images per second, using a specialized technique called Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) imaging, developed and implemented in collaboration with the Optical Physicists of the Biomedical Imaging Group.

        3D Deconvolution

        Additionally he has created the ability to rapidly produce 3-dimensional reconstructions of cells from 3-D images (using a process known as "deconvolution microscopy") by having developed and programmed a high-speed cluster of inexpensive computers (sometimes known as a Beowulf cluster) for this purpose.

        GPU Programming (CUDA)

        He was the first on campus to take advantage of using GPUs to exponentially speed up processing-intensive applications like 3D Deconvolution.

        Open Source Software

        A key feature of his efforts has been to contribute his software back to the scientific community. As an example, he is a significant contributor to uManager, an open source microscope acquisition package. He has contributed multiple device adapters, java classes, and bean shell scripts to the uManager code base, as well as solved difficult programming problems for the uManager community.

        Open Hardware

        Unlike Open Source Software, Open Hardware is fairly new and the basic tenets are as follows:

        "Open source hardware is hardware whose design is made publicly available so that anyone can study, modify, distribute, make, and sell the design or hardware based on that design."

        With that in mind, he recently developed an Open Hardware Focus Stabilization project called pgFocus. pg is short for "pretty good",  and is meant to poke fun at other names like Perfect Focus, Definite Focus, and Ultimate Focus.


        Focus Stabilization

        pgFocus monitors focal changes through the positional changes of a reflected laser beam.

        pgFocus Basic Implementation





        A significant feature of pgFocus is it acts as a "man-in-the-middle." It is designed to pass through faster high fidelity signals meant for a piezo Z controller while adding a slower focus control signal. This happens in the analog realm, which avoids sampling artefacts introduced by digitizing the original signal. This design also reduces the cost of pgFocus.

        pgFocus Circuit




        pgFocus Optical Layout





        More information about pgFocus can be found here:

        Academic Background

        1990, B.S.,  University of Massachusetts, Amherst
        1996, Ph.D., University of Baltimore, Maryland




        Bibliographic 
        selected publications
        List All   |   Timeline
        1. Guo D, Standley C, Bellve K, Fogarty K, Bao ZZ. Protein kinase Ca and integrin-linked kinase mediate the negative axon guidance effects of Sonic hedgehog. Mol Cell Neurosci. 2012 May; 50(1):82-92.
          View in: PubMed
        2. De Crescenzo V, Fogarty KE, Lefkowitz JJ, Bellve KD, Zvaritch E, Maclennan DH, Walsh JV. Type 1 ryanodine receptor knock-in mutation causing central core disease of skeletal muscle also displays a neuronal phenotype. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jan 10; 109(2):610-5.
          View in: PubMed
        3. Lefkowitz JJ, Fogarty KE, Lifshitz LM, Bellve KD, Tuft RA, ZhuGe R, Walsh JV, De Crescenzo V. Suppression of Ca2+ syntillas increases spontaneous exocytosis in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells. J Gen Physiol. 2009 Oct; 134(4):267-80.
          View in: PubMed
        4. Li X, Standley C, Sapp E, Valencia A, Qin ZH, Kegel KB, Yoder J, Comer-Tierney LA, Esteves M, Chase K, Alexander J, Masso N, Sobin L, Bellve K, Tuft R, Lifshitz L, Fogarty K, Aronin N, DiFiglia M. Mutant huntingtin impairs vesicle formation from recycling endosomes by interfering with Rab11 activity. Mol Cell Biol. 2009 Nov; 29(22):6106-16.
          View in: PubMed
        5. Kolpak AL, Jiang J, Guo D, Standley C, Bellve K, Fogarty K, Bao ZZ. Negative guidance factor-induced macropinocytosis in the growth cone plays a critical role in repulsive axon turning. J Neurosci. 2009 Aug 26; 29(34):10488-98.
          View in: PubMed
        6. Leonard D, Hayakawa A, Lawe D, Lambright D, Bellve KD, Standley C, Lifshitz LM, Fogarty KE, Corvera S. Sorting of EGF and transferrin at the plasma membrane and by cargo-specific signaling to EEA1-enriched endosomes. J Cell Sci. 2008 Oct 15; 121(Pt 20):3445-58.
          View in: PubMed
        7. Huang S, Lifshitz LM, Jones C, Bellve KD, Standley C, Fonseca S, Corvera S, Fogarty KE, Czech MP. Insulin stimulates membrane fusion and GLUT4 accumulation in clathrin coats on adipocyte plasma membranes. Mol Cell Biol. 2007 May; 27(9):3456-69.
          View in: PubMed
        8. Hayakawa A, Leonard D, Murphy S, Hayes S, Soto M, Fogarty K, Standley C, Bellve K, Lambright D, Mello C, Corvera S. The WD40 and FYVE domain containing protein 2 defines a class of early endosomes necessary for endocytosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Aug 8; 103(32):11928-33.
          View in: PubMed
        9. Bellve KD, Leonard D, Standley C, Lifshitz LM, Tuft RA, Hayakawa A, Corvera S, Fogarty KE. Plasma membrane domains specialized for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in primary cells. J Biol Chem. 2006 Jun 9; 281(23):16139-46.
          View in: PubMed
        10. Scriven DR, Klimek A, Asghari P, Bellve K, Moore ED. Caveolin-3 is adjacent to a group of extradyadic ryanodine receptors. Biophys J. 2005 Sep; 89(3):1893-901.
          View in: PubMed
        For assistance with using Profiles, please refer to the online tutorials or contact UMMS Help Desk or call 508-856-8643.
        Karl's Networks
        Click the "See All" links for more information and interactive visualizations!
        Concepts
        _
        Co-Authors
        _
        Similar People
        _
        Same Department
        Physical Neighbors
        _

        This is an official Page/Publication of the University of Massachusetts Worcester Campus
        Office of the Vice Provost for Research, 55 Lake Ave North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655
        Questions or Comments? Email: publicaffairs@umassmed.edu Phone: 508-856-1572