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    Keywords
    Last Name
    Institution

    Anthony N Imbalzano PhD

    TitleProfessor
    InstitutionUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School
    DepartmentCell and Developmental Biology
    AddressUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School
    55 Lake Avenue North
    Worcester MA 01655
    Phone508-856-1029
      Other Positions
      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentCell Biology

      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentInterdisciplinary Graduate Program

        Overview 
        Narrative

        Cell and Developmental Biology Department

        Academic Background

        B.A. (cum laude), University of Pennsylvania, 1986
        Ph.D., Harvard University, 1991
        Post-doctoral Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1991-1996
        Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 1997-2002
        Scholar of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, 1999-2004
        Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 2002 - Present

        Chromatin Structure and Regulation of Gene Expression, Cell Cycle, Cell Differentiation, and Oncogenesis

        The main focus of our research is to understand how factors that regulate the opening and closing of chromatin structure affect a diverse set of biological processes, including gene expression, cell cycle progression, initiation of cellular differentiation, tumorigenesis, and mouse development. Most of our work focuses on the mammalian SWI/SNF complexes, which are multi-subunit, ATP-dependent enzymes that alter chromatin structure. These evolutionarily conserved enzymes physically alter the structure of chromatin to regulate gene expression. Surprisingly, component subunits of these enzymes can interact with known tumor suppressors to regulate cell growth and also can act as tumor suppressors themselves. Some subunits are required for embryogenesis. Additionally, SWI/SNF proteins can be targeted by viral regulatory proteins upon infection of cells by diverse viruses such as HIV, HPV and EBV.

        Our past research efforts have reported isolation of human SWI/SNF complexes and functional characterization of their ability to alter in vitro assembled chromatin templates and promote transcription factor interactions with the template. Work on the mechanism of SWI/SNF mediated chromatin remodeling is ongoing in the lab, with specific interest in how post-translational histone modifications affect chromatin remodeling. To address biological function of these enzymes, we created cell lines that inducibly express mutant forms of the enzymes and are utilizing them to examine the role of these enzymes in numerous gene activation and cellular differentiation events. In particular, we have observed that expression of the mutant SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes prevents muscle and adipose differentiation. Detailed examination of the temporal interplay between tissue specific regulatory factors and diverse chromatin remodeling enzymes is in progress (see figure). To date, we have identified disparate functions for SWI/SNF enzymes at different promoters, including facilitation of pol II pre-initiation complex function and facilitation of activator binding to the promoter.

        In addition, we are continuing our efforts to assess the function of the SWI/SNF subunit termed Ini1. Ini1 is missing or mutated in a number of pediatric rhabdoid and other tumors, suggesting it acts as a tumor suppressor. In collaboration with Steve Jones’ lab, we previously showed that approximately 15% of mice heterozygous for Ini1 exhibit tumors, predominantly in the head and neck region, demonstrating that Ini1 does act as a tumor suppressor. Ini1 null embryos die around the time of implantation in the womb, indicating that Ini1 is essential for normal mouse development. However, analysis of SWI/SNF function in Ini1 deficient cells derived from patient tumors shows that multiple SWI/SNF functions are unaffected by the absence of Ini1. Further analyses of ini1 function and the regulation of Ini1 expression are in progress.

        Figure

        Temporal order of events during activation of the PPARgamma gene during adipogenesis
        (see Salma et al, MCB 24:4641, 2004)

         

        Imbalzano figure

        Laboratory Personnel

        Current Personnel

        Manuel Hernandez, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow 12/09-present
        Yu-Jie Hu, M.S.
        Graduate Student UMMS 7/09 - present
        Karen M. Imbalzano, M.S.
        Research Technician (joint with JA Nickerson), 5/03-present
        Scott E. LeBlanc, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow, 9/07 - present
        Recipient:NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship 5/10 – 4/13
        Brian T. Nasipak, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow, 12/07 - present
        Pasil Madany
        Research Technician (joint with JA Nickerson) 8/10 - present
        Qiong (Joae) Wu, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow 12/09 - present

        Previous Trainees

        Ok Hyun Cho, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow 10/09-2/11
        Current Position:Postdoctoral Fellow, Dept. of Pathology, UMass Medical School
        Chandrashekara Mallappa, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow, 9/07 -8/10
        CurrentPosition: Postdoctoral Fellow, DartmouthMedical School

        Nathalie Cohet, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow (joint with JA Nickerson) 4/06-12/08
        Current Position:Parenting in Lyon, France.

        Caroline S. Dacwag, Ph.D.
        Graduate Student, UMMS, 5/02 – 7/08
        Recipient:Zelda Haidak Memorial Scholar Fellowship 7/04 – 6/05
        Ph.D. Recipient:UMMS, 7/08
        Current Position:Postdoctoral Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mentor:Kenneth Chien, M.D., Ph.D.
        cdagwag@partners.org

        Concetta G.A.Marfella, Ph.D.
        Graduate Student, UMMS, 1/02 – 4/07
        Recipient:Zelda Haidak Memorial Scholar Fellowship 7/05 – 6/06
        Recipient:Zelda Haidak Memorial Scholar Fellowship 7/06 – 6/07
        Ph.D. Recipient: UMMS 4/07
        SubsequentPosition:Postdoctoral Fellow, Boston Children's Hospital, Mentor: Laurie Jackson-Grusby, Ph.D.
        Current Position:Scientific Writer, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA

        Yasuyuki Ohkawa, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow, 6/03-2/07
        Subsequent Position:Assistant Professor (tenure-track), Kyushu University Medical School

        Current Position: Associate Professor (tenure-track), Kyushu University Medical School
        yohkawa@epigenetics.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp
        Hengyi Xiao, Ph.D.
        Instructor, 2/02 - 8/06
        Current Position:Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, West China Center of Medical Sciences, Sichuan University

        hengyixiao@yahoo.com

        Nunciada Salma, Ph.D.
        Graduate Student, UMMS, 9/00 - 3/06
        Recipient:Zelda Haidak Memorial Scholar Fellowship 7/03 – 6/04
        Ph.D. recipient: UMass Medical School, 3/06
        Current Position:Postdoctoral Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mentor: David E. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D.

        snunciada@partners.org

        Kanaklata Roy, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow, 7/00 - 4/03
        Subsequent Position:Postdoctoral Fellow, Brudnick Neuropsych. Inst.
        Current Position: Registered Pharmacist and Instructor, Becker College, Worcester, MA
        Ivana L. de la Serna, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow, 8/98 – 12/03
        Research Assistant Professor, 1/04 – 8/05

        Recipient:NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship 8/00-7/02
        Recipient:Medical Foundation Fellowship 8/02-12/03
        Recipient:American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant 1/04 – 12/07
        Recipient:Transition to Independence Position (TIP) of the NIEHS (K22 Award) 3 year award made 3/04. Activated 9/05 upon start of independent position.
        Current Position:Assistant Professor (tenure-track), Dept. Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo Health Sciences Center (formerly Medical University of Ohio)

        Ivana.delaSerna@utoledo.edu
        David A. Hill, Ph.D.
        Postdoctoral Fellow,7/98 – 12/04
        Instructor, 1/05 – 6/06

        Recipient:ACS Postdoctoral Fellowship 7/00-6/03
        Recipient: American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant 6/06 (declined)
        Current Position: Scientist, Athena Diagnostics, Inc., Worcester, MA

        david.hill@athenadiagnostics.com

        Cynthia J. Guidi, Ph.D.
        Graduate Student, UMMS, 1/98 - 2/03
        Ph.D. recipient:UMass Medical School, 2/03
        Subsequent Position:Postdoctoral Fellow, U. Virginia Health Science Center,
        Mentor: Mitchell Smith, Ph.D
        Recipient:American Cancer Society Postdoctoral Fellowship 1/04-12/06
        Current Position:Scientist II, ImunoGen, Inc., Waltham, MA

        Kimberlee S. Mix, Ph.D.
        Undergraduate, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 6/97 - 4/98
        Winner:WPI Provost’s Award - Most Outstanding Senior Research Project, 1998
        Ph.D. recipient: Dartmouth College 9/03
        Current Position:
        Assistant Professor (tenure track), Dept. Biological Sciences, Loyola University New Orleans
        kmix@loyno.edu

         



        Rotation Projects

        Rotation Projects

        Project #1 The initiation of new programs of gene expression in differentiating cells requires chromatin remodeling enzymes in addition to tissue specific transcription factors. Characterization of the temporal events leading to gene activation during myogenesis and adipogenesis is ongoing using cell line models for differentiation. In vitro work with purified components is also ongoing to address mechanism of action. Multiple projects involving the role of chromatin remodeling enzymes during tissue specific gene expression are available.

        Project #2 Loss of the Ini1 subunit of SWI/SNF enzymes in children causes malignant rhabdoid tumors. In mice, targeted elimination of Ini1 results in early embryonic lethality and mice heterozygous for Ini1 are susceptible to tumor formation. Attempts to understand the function of the Ini1 protein in gene expression, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle regulation, development, and oncogenesis are in progress using molecular biology, biochemistry, and mouse modeling.



        Bibliographic 
        selected publications
        List All   |   Timeline
        1. Leblanc SE, Wu Q, Barutcu AR, Xiao H, Ohkawa Y, Imbalzano AN. The PPAR? Locus Makes Long-Range Chromatin Interactions with Selected Tissue-Specific Gene Loci during Adipocyte Differentiation in a Protein Kinase A Dependent Manner. PLoS One. 2014 Jan 20; 9(1):e86140.
          View in: PubMed
        2. Hu YJ, Sif S, Imbalzano AN. Prmt7 is dispensable in tissue culture models for adipogenic differentiation. F1000Res. 2013; 2:279.
          View in: PubMed
        3. Damiano L, Stewart KM, Cohet N, Mouw JK, Lakins JN, Debnath J, Reisman D, Nickerson JA, Imbalzano AN, Weaver VM. Oncogenic targeting of BRM drives malignancy through C/EBPß-dependent induction of a5 integrin. Oncogene. 2014 May 8; 33(19):2441-53.
          View in: PubMed
        4. Imbalzano AN, Imbalzano KM, Nickerson JA. BRG1, a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme ATPase, is required for maintenance of nuclear shape and integrity. Commun Integr Biol. 2013 Sep 1; 6(5):e25153.
          View in: PubMed
        5. Hernández-Hernández JM, Mallappa C, Nasipak BT, Oesterreich S, Imbalzano AN. The Scaffold attachment factor b1 (Safb1) regulates myogenic differentiation by facilitating the transition of myogenic gene chromatin from a repressed to an activated state. Nucleic Acids Res. 2013 Jun; 41(11):5704-16.
          View in: PubMed
        6. Imbalzano KM, Cohet N, Wu Q, Underwood JM, Imbalzano AN, Nickerson JA. Nuclear shape changes are induced by knockdown of the SWI/SNF ATPase BRG1 and are independent of cytoskeletal connections. PLoS One. 2013; 8(2):e55628.
          View in: PubMed
        7. Tortelote GG, Hernández-Hernández JM, Quaresma AJ, Nickerson JA, Imbalzano AN, Rivera-Pérez JA. Wnt3 function in the epiblast is required for the maintenance but not the initiation of gastrulation in mice. Dev Biol. 2013 Feb 1; 374(1):164-73.
          View in: PubMed
        8. Karkhanis V, Wang L, Tae S, Hu YJ, Imbalzano AN, Sif S. Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 regulates cellular response to DNA damage by methylating promoter histones H2A and H4 of the polymerase d catalytic subunit gene, POLD1. J Biol Chem. 2012 Aug 24; 287(35):29801-14.
          View in: PubMed
        9. Harada A, Okada S, Konno D, Odawara J, Yoshimi T, Yoshimura S, Kumamaru H, Saiwai H, Tsubota T, Kurumizaka H, Akashi K, Tachibana T, Imbalzano AN, Ohkawa Y. Chd2 interacts with H3.3 to determine myogenic cell fate. EMBO J. 2012 Jun 29; 31(13):2994-3007.
          View in: PubMed
        10. LeBlanc SE, Konda S, Wu Q, Hu YJ, Oslowski CM, Sif S, Imbalzano AN. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (Prmt5) promotes gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ?2 (PPAR?2) and its target genes during adipogenesis. Mol Endocrinol. 2012 Apr; 26(4):583-97.
          View in: PubMed
        11. Ohkawa Y, Mallappa C, Vallaster CS, Imbalzano AN. An improved restriction enzyme accessibility assay for analyzing changes in chromatin structure in samples of limited cell number. Methods Mol Biol. 2012; 798:531-42.
          View in: PubMed
        12. Ohkawa Y, Mallappa C, Vallaster CS, Imbalzano AN. Isolation of nuclei from skeletal muscle satellite cells and myofibers for use in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Methods Mol Biol. 2012; 798:517-30.
          View in: PubMed
        13. Karkhanis V, Hu YJ, Baiocchi RA, Imbalzano AN, Sif S. Versatility of PRMT5-induced methylation in growth control and development. Trends Biochem Sci. 2011 Dec; 36(12):633-41.
          View in: PubMed
        14. Mudhasani R, Puri V, Hoover K, Czech MP, Imbalzano AN, Jones SN. Dicer is required for the formation of white but not brown adipose tissue. J Cell Physiol. 2011 May; 226(5):1399-406.
          View in: PubMed
        15. Pockwinse SM, Kota KP, Quaresma AJ, Imbalzano AN, Lian JB, van Wijnen AJ, Stein JL, Stein GS, Nickerson JA. Live cell imaging of the cancer-related transcription factor RUNX2 during mitotic progression. J Cell Physiol. 2011 May; 226(5):1383-9.
          View in: PubMed
        16. Cho OH, Rivera-Pérez JA, Imbalzano AN. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay for tissue-specific genes using early-stage mouse embryos. J Vis Exp. 2011; (50).
          View in: PubMed
        17. Xiao H, Leblanc SE, Wu Q, Konda S, Salma N, Marfella CG, Ohkawa Y, Imbalzano AN. Chromatin accessibility and transcription factor binding at the PPAR?2 promoter during adipogenesis is protein kinase A-dependent. J Cell Physiol. 2011 Jan; 226(1):86-93.
          View in: PubMed
        18. Bakshi R, Hassan MQ, Pratap J, Lian JB, Montecino MA, van Wijnen AJ, Stein JL, Imbalzano AN, Stein GS. The human SWI/SNF complex associates with RUNX1 to control transcription of hematopoietic target genes. J Cell Physiol. 2010 Nov; 225(2):569-76.
          View in: PubMed
        19. Mallappa C, Hu YJ, Shamulailatpam P, Tae S, Sif S, Imbalzano AN. The expression of myogenic microRNAs indirectly requires protein arginine methyltransferase (Prmt)5 but directly requires Prmt4. Nucleic Acids Res. 2011 Mar; 39(4):1243-55.
          View in: PubMed
        20. Mudhasani R, Imbalzano AN, Jones SN. An essential role for Dicer in adipocyte differentiation. J Cell Biochem. 2010 Jul 1; 110(4):812-6.
          View in: PubMed
        21. Cohet N, Stewart KM, Mudhasani R, Asirvatham AJ, Mallappa C, Imbalzano KM, Weaver VM, Imbalzano AN, Nickerson JA. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme ATPases promote cell proliferation in normal mammary epithelial cells. J Cell Physiol. 2010 Jun; 223(3):667-78.
          View in: PubMed
        22. Mallappa C, Nasipak BT, Etheridge L, Androphy EJ, Jones SN, Sagerström CG, Ohkawa Y, Imbalzano AN. Myogenic microRNA expression requires ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme function. Mol Cell Biol. 2010 Jul; 30(13):3176-86.
          View in: PubMed
        23. Stein GS, van Wijnen AJ, Imbalzano AN, Montecino M, Zaidi SK, Lian JB, Nickerson JA, Stein JL. Architectural genetic and epigenetic control of regulatory networks: compartmentalizing machinery for transcription and chromatin remodeling in nuclear microenvironments. Crit Rev Eukaryot Gene Expr. 2010; 20(2):149-55.
          View in: PubMed
        24. Pratap J, Imbalzano KM, Underwood JM, Cohet N, Gokul K, Akech J, van Wijnen AJ, Stein JL, Imbalzano AN, Nickerson JA, Lian JB, Stein GS. Ectopic runx2 expression in mammary epithelial cells disrupts formation of normal acini structure: implications for breast cancer progression. Cancer Res. 2009 Sep 1; 69(17):6807-14.
          View in: PubMed
        25. Cruzat F, Henriquez B, Villagra A, Hepp M, Lian JB, van Wijnen AJ, Stein JL, Imbalzano AN, Stein GS, Montecino M. SWI/SNF-independent nuclease hypersensitivity and an increased level of histone acetylation at the P1 promoter accompany active transcription of the bone master gene Runx2. Biochemistry. 2009 Aug 4; 48(30):7287-95.
          View in: PubMed
        26. Naidu SR, Love IM, Imbalzano AN, Grossman SR, Androphy EJ. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling subunit BRG1 is a critical regulator of p53 necessary for proliferation of malignant cells. Oncogene. 2009 Jul 9; 28(27):2492-501.
          View in: PubMed
        27. Zhou J, Zhang M, Fang H, El-Mounayri O, Rodenberg JM, Imbalzano AN, Herring BP. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex regulates myocardin-induced smooth muscle-specific gene expression. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2009 Jun; 29(6):921-8.
          View in: PubMed
        28. Imbalzano KM, Tatarkova I, Imbalzano AN, Nickerson JA. Increasingly transformed MCF-10A cells have a progressively tumor-like phenotype in three-dimensional basement membrane culture. Cancer Cell Int. 2009; 9:7.
          View in: PubMed
        29. Dacwag CS, Bedford MT, Sif S, Imbalzano AN. Distinct protein arginine methyltransferases promote ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling function at different stages of skeletal muscle differentiation. Mol Cell Biol. 2009 Apr; 29(7):1909-21.
          View in: PubMed
        30. Lai D, Wan M, Wu J, Preston-Hurlburt P, Kushwaha R, Grundström T, Imbalzano AN, Chi T. Induction of TLR4-target genes entails calcium/calmodulin-dependent regulation of chromatin remodeling. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Jan 27; 106(4):1169-74.
          View in: PubMed
        31. Marfella CG, Henninger N, LeBlanc SE, Krishnan N, Garlick DS, Holzman LB, Imbalzano AN. A mutation in the mouse Chd2 chromatin remodeling enzyme results in a complex renal phenotype. Kidney Blood Press Res. 2008; 31(6):421-32.
          View in: PubMed
        32. Coles AH, Marfella CG, Imbalzano AN, Steinman HA, Garlick DS, Gerstein RM, Jones SN. p37Ing1b regulates B-cell proliferation and cooperates with p53 to suppress diffuse large B-cell lymphomagenesis. Cancer Res. 2008 Nov 1; 68(21):8705-14.
          View in: PubMed
        33. Mudhasani R, Zhu Z, Hutvagner G, Eischen CM, Lyle S, Hall LL, Lawrence JB, Imbalzano AN, Jones SN. Loss of miRNA biogenesis induces p19Arf-p53 signaling and senescence in primary cells. J Cell Biol. 2008 Jun 30; 181(7):1055-63.
          View in: PubMed
        34. Ounzain S, Dacwag CS, Samani NJ, Imbalzano AN, Chong NW. Comparative in silico analysis identifies bona fide MyoD binding sites within the Myocyte stress 1 gene promoter. BMC Mol Biol. 2008; 9:50.
          View in: PubMed
        35. Ali SA, Zaidi SK, Dacwag CS, Salma N, Young DW, Shakoori AR, Montecino MA, Lian JB, van Wijnen AJ, Imbalzano AN, Stein GS, Stein JL. Phenotypic transcription factors epigenetically mediate cell growth control. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 May 6; 105(18):6632-7.
          View in: PubMed
        36. Das AV, James J, Bhattacharya S, Imbalzano AN, Antony ML, Hegde G, Zhao X, Mallya K, Ahmad F, Knudsen E, Ahmad I. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling ATPase Brm regulates the differentiation of early retinal stem cells/progenitors by influencing Brn3b expression and Notch signaling. J Biol Chem. 2007 Nov 30; 282(48):35187-201.
          View in: PubMed
        37. Coles AH, Liang H, Zhu Z, Marfella CG, Kang J, Imbalzano AN, Jones SN. Deletion of p37Ing1 in mice reveals a p53-independent role for Ing1 in the suppression of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Cancer Res. 2007 Mar 1; 67(5):2054-61.
          View in: PubMed
        38. Gutiérrez J, Paredes R, Cruzat F, Hill DA, van Wijnen AJ, Lian JB, Stein GS, Stein JL, Imbalzano AN, Montecino M. Chromatin remodeling by SWI/SNF results in nucleosome mobilization to preferential positions in the rat osteocalcin gene promoter. J Biol Chem. 2007 Mar 30; 282(13):9445-57.
          View in: PubMed
        39. Young DW, Hassan MQ, Pratap J, Galindo M, Zaidi SK, Lee SH, Yang X, Xie R, Javed A, Underwood JM, Furcinitti P, Imbalzano AN, Penman S, Nickerson JA, Montecino MA, Lian JB, Stein JL, van Wijnen AJ, Stein GS. Mitotic occupancy and lineage-specific transcriptional control of rRNA genes by Runx2. Nature. 2007 Jan 25; 445(7126):442-6.
          View in: PubMed
        40. Marfella CG, Imbalzano AN. The Chd family of chromatin remodelers. Mutat Res. 2007 May 1; 618(1-2):30-40.
          View in: PubMed
        41. Ohkawa Y, Yoshimura S, Higashi C, Marfella CG, Dacwag CS, Tachibana T, Imbalzano AN. Myogenin and the SWI/SNF ATPase Brg1 maintain myogenic gene expression at different stages of skeletal myogenesis. J Biol Chem. 2007 Mar 2; 282(9):6564-70.
          View in: PubMed
        42. Kumar RA, Naidu SR, Wang X, Imbalzano AN, Androphy EJ. Interaction of papillomavirus E2 protein with the Brm chromatin remodeling complex leads to enhanced transcriptional activation. J Virol. 2007 Mar; 81(5):2213-20.
          View in: PubMed
        43. Dacwag CS, Ohkawa Y, Pal S, Sif S, Imbalzano AN. The protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt5 is required for myogenesis because it facilitates ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. Mol Cell Biol. 2007 Jan; 27(1):384-94.
          View in: PubMed
        44. Marfella CG, Ohkawa Y, Coles AH, Garlick DS, Jones SN, Imbalzano AN. Mutation of the SNF2 family member Chd2 affects mouse development and survival. J Cell Physiol. 2006 Oct; 209(1):162-71.
          View in: PubMed
        45. Park JH, Park EJ, Lee HS, Kim SJ, Hur SK, Imbalzano AN, Kwon J. Mammalian SWI/SNF complexes facilitate DNA double-strand break repair by promoting gamma-H2AX induction. EMBO J. 2006 Sep 6; 25(17):3986-97.
          View in: PubMed
        46. Guidi CJ, Mudhasani R, Hoover K, Koff A, Leav I, Imbalzano AN, Jones SN. Functional interaction of the retinoblastoma and Ini1/Snf5 tumor suppressors in cell growth and pituitary tumorigenesis. Cancer Res. 2006 Aug 15; 66(16):8076-82.
          View in: PubMed
        47. Underwood JM, Imbalzano KM, Weaver VM, Fischer AH, Imbalzano AN, Nickerson JA. The ultrastructure of MCF-10A acini. J Cell Physiol. 2006 Jul; 208(1):141-8.
          View in: PubMed
        48. Villagra A, Cruzat F, Carvallo L, Paredes R, Olate J, van Wijnen AJ, Stein GS, Lian JB, Stein JL, Imbalzano AN, Montecino M. Chromatin remodeling and transcriptional activity of the bone-specific osteocalcin gene require CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta-dependent recruitment of SWI/SNF activity. J Biol Chem. 2006 Aug 11; 281(32):22695-706.
          View in: PubMed
        49. de la Serna IL, Ohkawa Y, Imbalzano AN. Chromatin remodelling in mammalian differentiation: lessons from ATP-dependent remodellers. Nat Rev Genet. 2006 Jun; 7(6):461-73.
          View in: PubMed
        50. de la Serna IL, Ohkawa Y, Higashi C, Dutta C, Osias J, Kommajosyula N, Tachibana T, Imbalzano AN. The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor requires SWI/SNF enzymes to activate melanocyte-specific genes. J Biol Chem. 2006 Jul 21; 281(29):20233-41.
          View in: PubMed
        51. Ramirez-Carrozzi VR, Nazarian AA, Li CC, Gore SL, Sridharan R, Imbalzano AN, Smale ST. Selective and antagonistic functions of SWI/SNF and Mi-2beta nucleosome remodeling complexes during an inflammatory response. Genes Dev. 2006 Feb 1; 20(3):282-96.
          View in: PubMed
        52. Salma N, Xiao H, Imbalzano AN. Temporal recruitment of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins to early and late adipogenic promoters in vivo. J Mol Endocrinol. 2006 Feb; 36(1):139-51.
          View in: PubMed
        53. Hill DA, Imbalzano AN. HMGN1 is dispensable for myogenesis and adipogenesis. Gene. 2006 Apr 12; 371(1):59-67.
          View in: PubMed
        54. Ohkawa Y, Marfella CG, Imbalzano AN. Skeletal muscle specification by myogenin and Mef2D via the SWI/SNF ATPase Brg1. EMBO J. 2006 Feb 8; 25(3):490-501.
          View in: PubMed
        55. Vradii D, Wagner S, Doan DN, Nickerson JA, Montecino M, Lian JB, Stein JL, van Wijnen AJ, Imbalzano AN, Stein GS. Brg1, the ATPase subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, is required for myeloid differentiation to granulocytes. J Cell Physiol. 2006 Jan; 206(1):112-8.
          View in: PubMed
        56. Im H, Grass JA, Johnson KD, Kim SI, Boyer ME, Imbalzano AN, Bieker JJ, Bresnick EH. Chromatin domain activation via GATA-1 utilization of a small subset of dispersed GATA motifs within a broad chromosomal region. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Nov 22; 102(47):17065-70.
          View in: PubMed
        57. Hill DA, Peterson CL, Imbalzano AN. Effects of HMGN1 on chromatin structure and SWI/SNF-mediated chromatin remodeling. J Biol Chem. 2005 Dec 16; 280(50):41777-83.
          View in: PubMed
        58. de la Serna IL, Ohkawa Y, Berkes CA, Bergstrom DA, Dacwag CS, Tapscott SJ, Imbalzano AN. MyoD targets chromatin remodeling complexes to the myogenin locus prior to forming a stable DNA-bound complex. Mol Cell Biol. 2005 May; 25(10):3997-4009.
          View in: PubMed
        59. Imbalzano AN, Jones SN. Snf5 tumor suppressor couples chromatin remodeling, checkpoint control, and chromosomal stability. Cancer Cell. 2005 Apr; 7(4):294-5.
          View in: PubMed
        60. Young DW, Pratap J, Javed A, Weiner B, Ohkawa Y, van Wijnen A, Montecino M, Stein GS, Stein JL, Imbalzano AN, Lian JB. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is obligatory for BMP2-induced, Runx2-dependent skeletal gene expression that controls osteoblast differentiation. J Cell Biochem. 2005 Mar 1; 94(4):720-30.
          View in: PubMed
        61. Hill DA, Chiosea S, Jamaluddin S, Roy K, Fischer AH, Boyd DD, Nickerson JA, Imbalzano AN. Inducible changes in cell size and attachment area due to expression of a mutant SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme. J Cell Sci. 2004 Nov 15; 117(Pt 24):5847-54.
          View in: PubMed
        62. Biswas D, Imbalzano AN, Eriksson P, Yu Y, Stillman DJ. Role for Nhp6, Gcn5, and the Swi/Snf complex in stimulating formation of the TATA-binding protein-TFIIA-DNA complex. Mol Cell Biol. 2004 Sep; 24(18):8312-21.
          View in: PubMed
        63. Simone C, Forcales SV, Hill DA, Imbalzano AN, Latella L, Puri PL. p38 pathway targets SWI-SNF chromatin-remodeling complex to muscle-specific loci. Nat Genet. 2004 Jul; 36(7):738-43.
          View in: PubMed
        64. Salma N, Xiao H, Mueller E, Imbalzano AN. Temporal recruitment of transcription factors and SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling enzymes during adipogenic induction of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma nuclear hormone receptor. Mol Cell Biol. 2004 Jun; 24(11):4651-63.
          View in: PubMed
        65. Doan DN, Veal TM, Yan Z, Wang W, Jones SN, Imbalzano AN. Loss of the INI1 tumor suppressor does not impair the expression of multiple BRG1-dependent genes or the assembly of SWI/SNF enzymes. Oncogene. 2004 Apr 22; 23(19):3462-73.
          View in: PubMed
        66. Hill DA, de la Serna IL, Veal TM, Imbalzano AN. BRCA1 interacts with dominant negative SWI/SNF enzymes without affecting homologous recombination or radiation-induced gene activation of p21 or Mdm2. J Cell Biochem. 2004 Apr 1; 91(5):987-98.
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        93. Imbalzano AN, DeLuca NA. Substitution of a TATA box from a herpes simplex virus late gene in the viral thymidine kinase promoter alters ICP4 inducibility but not temporal expression. J Virol. 1992 Sep; 66(9):5453-63.
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        95. Imbalzano AN, Shepard AA, DeLuca NA. Functional relevance of specific interactions between herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP4 and sequences from the promoter-regulatory domain of the viral thymidine kinase gene. J Virol. 1990 Jun; 64(6):2620-31.
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        96. Shepard AA, Imbalzano AN, DeLuca NA. Separation of primary structural components conferring autoregulation, transactivation, and DNA-binding properties to the herpes simplex virus transcriptional regulatory protein ICP4. J Virol. 1989 Sep; 63(9):3714-28.
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