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    Roger J Davis PhD

    TitleProfessor
    InstitutionUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School
    DepartmentProgram in Molecular Medicine
    AddressUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School
    373 Plantation Street, Room 309
    Worcester MA 01605
    Phone508-856-6054
      Other Positions
      InstitutionUMMS - School of Medicine
      DepartmentBiochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentBiochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentCancer Biology

      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentInterdisciplinary Graduate Program

      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentMD/PhD Program

      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentNeuroscience

      InstitutionUMMS - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      DepartmentTranslational Science

      InstitutionUMMS - Programs, Centers and Institutes
      DepartmentCenter for AIDS Research

        Biography 
        awards and honors
        The Royal Society2002Fellow
        Overview 
        Narrative

        Academic Background

        Roger J. Davis received his BA (1979) and his PhD (1983) from the Department of Biochemistry at Cambridge University (U.K.). He received a Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Cancer Fund Fellowship to do postdoctoral work at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Following his postdoctoral work, he remained at the University of Massachusetts Medical School as a faculty member. He is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a Fellow of the Royal Society.

        Mechanisms by which growth factors regulate cellular proliferation

        Photo: Roger DavisThe goal of this laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanism by which growth factors and cytokines regulate cellular proliferation and survival. A specific focus of our studies is to understand how MAP kinase signaling pathways, which are initiated at the cell surface, regulate the expression of genes in the nucleus.

        These MAP kinase pathways include the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), the c-Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNKs), and the p38 MAP kinases. The methods that we are using include recombinant DNA technology, protein chemistry, somatic cell genetics, and general biochemical techniques.

        The significance of this research is that there are many disease states, such as cancer, that are characterized by abnormal cellular proliferation. A detailed understanding of the molecular processes involved in the control of cell growth is required for the design of rational treatments for these diseases.

        Figure

        Schematic diagram

        Figure Legend

        Schematic representation of the human MAP kinase signal transduction pathway network.



        Rotation Projects

        Rotation Projects

        Laboratory rotations are available to study signal mammalian transduction mechanisms. Several projects are available, including studies of protein kinase cascades, gene expression, the cell cycle, and apoptosis. Targeted gene disruption approaches in mice combined with biochemical and molecular biology studies will be examined.



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